The Workchop Conversations with Jesutooni Ajiboye

The Workchop Conversations is an ongoing series of conversations with different players in both the legal tech & justice tech space, sharing about their work and innovative role within the space, promoting access to justice in Africa.

This week, we have Jesutooni Ajiboye, a Lawyer and a freelance writer, working an in-House role with one of the pioneer financial institutions in Lagos, Nigeria. He also works in a product marketing role with a Fintech startup, SwipeNG, based out of Lagos and operating in Nigeria. Jesutooni believes that its been fun ever since he found out that working in tech always offers you the opportunity to criss-cross industries and even job roles, sometimes. 

How is a typical day like at SwipeNG?

So, SwipeNG is a startup which seeks to provide interest-free credit to users across Nigeria through credit cards. A product marketing role basically entails selling the main products of the company to users through stories, graphics, blogposts and other means of marketing. This also entails managing the social media outlook of the fintech firm as well as working with other deoartments in bringing great customer experience for users. For me, it’s been an exciting role as I enjoy talking about impactful financial products and I’m confident what we have started at SwipeNG will reshape the microlending sector, in the long run. 

What apps, gadgets or tools do you use for work and how do you use them?

There are quite a number of software and hardware solutions which I use that positively impact my work. I’d say one of the most impactful software solutions for remote work, which has fully been in place since I started working with SwipeNG, is Slack. I admire how Slack has reshaped working with different departments and it is just like having your physical office on your phone or laptop. Of course there are concerns about how this affects one’s work-life balance but that has not really been a problem for me, working at SwipeNG. Regarding other tools which I use, some affect my work directly such as Copy.ai (a friend actually introduced me to this tool) and it is great for all copywriters out there. Another tool which I regularly use is Notion which helps me structure my to-dos and deliverables. The wonder with Notion is that it helps you add various types of files so it really is the perfect Virtual Assistant for a freelancer. 

What are you currently reading, watching listening to?

What am I reading? Currently, not reading a book. Confession, I buy more books than I read most times. However, I do podcasts more and I would readily recommend Business Wars by Wondery, The Intelligence by Economist and Fintech Insider Podcast by 11 FS. These are just some of the podcasts I listen to for fun and education. What am I watching? The Office (US), a comedy series about workplace drama and life.

Who would you like to answer these questions?

Ohotu Ogbeche, Ademola Adeyoju, Ademola Adekunbi and Mallick Bolakale readily come to mind as people who work in Law and Tech. You may also want to speak with the Co-Founder of SwipeNG, Temidayo Dauda, who is also a Lawyer.

The Workchop Conversations with Damilola Ajiboye : Product Manager at DIYlaw Nigeria

The Workchop Conversations is an ongoing series of conversations with different players in both the legal tech & justice tech space, sharing about their work and innovative role within the space, promoting access to justice in Africa.

This week, we have Damilola Ajiboye, Product Manager at DIYlaw. Damilola is an avid learner and a technology enthusiast. In the past, he had tried his hands on different things like Digital Marketing, Web design, and development, and fashion blogging. Currently, he finds himself always excited about using technology to solve user’s pain points hence his passion for product management. At DIYlaw, he manages the company’s products by working with customers and team members to improve on already existing product offerings and introduce new products that address user’s vulnerabilities.

Tell us, what’s your typical workday like?

I start the day by checking emails (To see if I’m not serving as a bottleneck to any process) and attend to them as a matter of priority, I then check the product backlog and track progress, Monitor key metrics, NPS, and compare with same weekday of the previous week, I check the product roadmap to see if there are initiatives/timelines that need adjustment, wrap up the day by reading Industry news from Google Alerts.

Tell us about the products/services you manage at DIYlaw.

I manage DIY Registrations, DIY Documents, DIY Engage, DIY Resources, and some products in the pipeline.

What apps, gadgets or tools have you been relying on to work and how do you use them?

The apps I use are Slack for Communication, GSuite for Team Collaboration, Jira for Project Management and Roadmapping, Figma for Design and Prototyping, Google Analytics for Data Analytics, and Delighted for Net Promoter Score. 

What are you currently reading, watching or listening to?

I listen to NPR’s How I Built This Podcast by Guy Raz. It’s a podcast on how entrepreneurs (startup founders) painstakingly built their businesses from the ground up. It’s an amazing show. 

Who would you like to answer these questions?

I nominate Oluwatosin Amusan.

The Workchop Conversations with Selina Onyando

The Workchop Conversations is an ongoing series of conversations with different players in both the legal tech & justicetech space, sharing about their work and innovative role within the space, promoting access to justice in Africa.

Our next conversation is with Selina Onyando, Tech Policy Fellow at The Lawyers Hub, Kenya where she works in promoting creative policy solutions for inclusive and sustainable digital economies. 

What does your job as a Tech Policy Fellow entail? Could you give us a peep into your everyday life at work.

As a Tech Policy Fellow, most of my work is centered around capacity building for young entrepreneurs in Africa, as well as policy review and co-creation. A typical day consists of meetings with the Lawyers Hub team and partners. In the evenings, I like to get into research and drafting. Its the best time for me to work; there are not as many distractions. 

What apps, gadgets, or tools have you been relying on to work from home, and how do you use them? 

I always have my laptop, phone and tablet with me. I use them interchangeably depending on where I am or what I’m working on. I rely heavily on my phone for calls, emails and working on documents on the fly. For apps, Zoom is my go-to platform for meetings. I also leverage monday.com to keep track of my tasks and what the rest of the team is up to. I cannot live without iCalendar as it helps me keep track of events and meetings. My most important app has to be Google Docs. Its easier to co-create with and syncs well with all my devices. 

What are you currently reading, watching or listening to?

My current read is, Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi. I hope to delve more into that. I’m not big on TV, but can’t stop watching Somebody Feed Phil on Netflix. A huge chunk of my free time is spent listening to music. I currently have a few albums on rotation, including, Amaaraes, The Angel You Don’t Know and Freddie Gibbs, Alfredo. I’ve also been listening to a playlist that I curate every year; it features my favourite tracks from 2020. 

Who would you like to answer these questions?

Linda Bonyo, CEO, Lawyers Hub Kenya.

The Workchop Conversations with Elizabeth Babatunde

The Workchop Conversations with Elizabeth Babatunde

The Workchop Conversations is an ongoing series of conversations with different players in both the legaltech & justicetech space, sharing about their work and innovative role within the space, promoting access to justice in Africa.

Our first conversation is with Elizabeth Babatunde,  a lawyer, business developer and product manager with LawPavilion Business Solutions.

Tell us about yourself and what you do at LawPavillion.

I am Elizabeth Babatunde, a lawyer, business developer and product manager. I am passionate about building people, products and businesses. I am essentially a creative person. At LawPavilion, I work as a Product Manager. I currently manage the LawPavilion Prime product portfolio: leading in the development of all the technological versions – Prime Desktop Distribution (Windows and MAC OS) and Mobile application (Android and iOS). My work in LawPavilion is an interesting roller coaster that allows me to work with cross-functional and global teams. It also involves continuous research, user engagement and contributing to the brand positioning of the products developed by the company. 

What is your everyday life like at work?

Work in LawPavilion is exciting and impacting, as everything is constantly morphing into something bigger and better. This simply means that what you know today isn’t enough for tomorrow. My typical workday starts with meetings and ends with a mind full of ideas that need re-working.

What led you down the Product manager path and would you change anything?

I think it is my love for seeing ideas take on a life of their own. I wouldn’t change anything, yet.

Tell us a bit about the products you manage.

The products I manage form a portfolio of the company’s most popular and most-used product – LawPavilion Prime. Prime is Nigeria’s first tech-enabled legal research and legal analytics tool. It is serviced by one of the largest legal databases in Nigeria, and so, it provides its users with access to e-Law Reports (the popularly cited LPELR – developed by LawPavilion over a decade ago), LFN, State Laws, Textbooks and Journals, Rules and Regulations – federal and state – just to mention a few. The product is designed to service users across a spectrum of technologies. Prime is developed using the Agile SCRUM methodology and is constantly being upgraded to meet user needs and global standards. 

The future of the product is a full scale global legal research and analytics solution for everyone seeking information about the law or seeking or servicing access to justice. 

To aid your productivity, what tech tools have you been relying on to work, and how do you use them?

 My go-to tools for working from home is the Google Workspace (formerly G Suite) – it provides all the collaborative tools I need. GitLab for managing my engineering teams. Zoom Meetings for stakeholder meetings. Slack functions as my virtual workspace. Zoho Mail. Miro, Figma and XD for prototypes and visual mockups. My laptop and smart phone. Lastly, I always have my pen and notebook as the most reliable backup and “think-pad”. 

 Wondering what you are currently reading, watching or listening to?

Currently watching Gotham 

Who would you like us to ask these questions?

Ogunsua Gabriel, Senior UI/UX Developer at LawPavilion Business Solutions.

The Women in the Nigerian LegalTech Space

The Women in the Nigerian LegalTech Space

In celebration of International Women’s Day, 2020, Techlawyered would like to share with you the stories of extraordinary women in Nigeria who are innovating in their various roles, while leveraging technology to improve the legal practice and access to justice.

  1. Rahila Olu-Silas Ambassador, World Legal Summit (West Africa)
  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • Collaborating with Open Law Library Washington DC, a U.S.A based Not-for-Profit Organization to automate the process of Bill drafting, codification, and publication of laws in digital formats in Nigeria
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • Researching the legal framework that will enable the adoption of Machine-Consumable legislation in Nigeria. This will enable emerging technologies to consume our laws through APIs and process them without the human factor.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The possibility of change in the way legal services is delivered in Nigeria

2. Funkola Odeleye , Co-founder and CEO at DIYLaw.ng

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • I am not sure we have hit our biggest success yet but being able to simplify legal services and topics and making them attainable and understandable comes close
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • The problem that we are trying to solve is making legal services accessible and our biggest challenge is how to make it accessible for those without access to technology. It is an irony of sorts.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The sheer number of jobs that are being created because people are able to launch their businesses through our platform keeps me going. Also, getting kind words and referrals from people who have used our platform is an affirmation that we are doing something right.

3. Adejoke Are , Co-founder/Project Lead, The Flemer Project

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • I run an organization – the Flemer Project – that helps indigent pretrial detainees conclude their matters in court as quickly as possible, by leveraging on the support of young volunteer lawyers who directly provide legal representation to these detainees. Although we are never physically present in court to monitor the performance of our volunteer lawyers, incorporating technology into our solution has made monitoring and evaluating their work quite a seamless affair. Through this approach, we have been able to provide legal representation to almost 200 indigent pretrial detainees and to secure the release of 60 of them from prison.
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • I don’t have any technical experience or skill in building technology platforms and this has been a drag on the development of a comprehensive technology platform needed to manage our overall operations.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The passion of our young volunteer lawyers who go over and beyond to give their best to people who can never repay them, and the fact that our solution literally changes people’s lives by helping them regain their freedom.

4. Oluwatosin Amusan , Product Development Lead, Mylaw.ng

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • Delivering legal services to customers via technology, from the comfort of their couch. The fact that my team and I were able to develop products and show value enough to earn the trust of customers who end up drawing on the products on mylaw.ng and coming back for more.
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • Constantly answering the question “Is legal technology a viable sector in Nigeria”. Looking at it from a global perspective with 3 unicorns in legal tech this question does not surface in the international scene. However, In Nigeria, we have quite a number of legal tech startups who have to prove themselves 10 times harder, show double the traction required to prove that this is a viable sector.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The refusal to settle for mediocrity. I make it a ritual to look back at works I have done in various facets of my life every six months, and without a doubt, I see the growth not just intellectually but in physical form. It is easy to get complacent with doing just what is required, but there is always room to improve and do better. No one changed the world by doing what just was required of them.

5. Faith Obafemi , Head of Strategy, Future-Proof Intelligence

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • Establishing as a recognized expert in the blockchain space in less than 2 years. This has been a never-ending journey that has stretched me intellectually, financially, emotionally and otherwise. But, I have been better for it. I have met some of the most amazing persons on this journey. People who help broaden your horizon. 
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • Breaking/building a tech foundation. In the early days, things were just mostly Greek to me. But, the more I kept at it, the familiar it became and the easier it was to understand. 
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • Money! Hahaha, I know most people would’ve been expecting something knight worthy like passion to help others, desire to impact, etc. Well, why all that is great, it still requires money. I am yet to see a broke person help another or have an impact on others.  So, yes, money motivates me to keep going. Because, with money as a tool, I can achieve other things that I hold dear.

6. Rhoda Obi-Adigwe, Founder Wemora.

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • Our greatest success was when Hill gave us an award and a grant for our legal software which aids in the writing of will and creation of trust online. This was very inspiring to us knowing that our efforts were being recognized.
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • Our biggest challenge to legal technology is cultural and traditional bias. People are still skeptical to include their personal and private details online making it difficult to prepare legal documents for them. This fear also arises from the fact that the country has no stringent data policy laws.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The legal tech space is evolving and we are beginning to see most traditional things done online like the CAC providing platforms for business registration, so our motivation is to keep pressing knowing fully well that these changes and policies will soon affect our own part of legal IT.

7. Yinka Bada , Lead Product Manager, LawPavilion Business Solutions

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • One of the things I can consider as part of my biggest success in legal technology is two-fold: i. My involvement in conceptualizing and facilitating the development and continuous improvement of software solutions that solve challenges around Practice Management, Legal Research and Legal Drafting for lawyers and judges, hence improving their efficiency by making it easier for them to do more in less time than usual. I’ve been working with a team of bright minds to continuously improve the leading Electronic Law Reports platform; the only one with Legal Analytics, and most cited in courts by top lawyers, and judges of both the Court of Appeal and Supreme Court. ii. Leading and mentoring at different times,  young and aspiring Product Managers and Software Engineers  to passionately seek to identify the pain points in our justice delivery system, and  proffer innovative solutions
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • What I can consider as a challenge for me in legal technology is the huge amount of time, efforts and resources it has taken over the years to build and communicate the value of legal-tech solutions to the conservative legal industry; the sweet thing, however, is that this same industry is now embracing technology fully, and even asking for more
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • The joy of facilitating an accelerated (albeit gradual) access to justice in Nigeria-  the possibility of having the practice of law and ultimately, the dispensation of justice continually become technologically improved for more efficiency and effectiveness.

8. Nankunda Katangaza , Co-founder, African Law & Tech Network (ALT Network)

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • I guess my biggest success in legal technology was in following my hunch that there was a need and interest on the part of African legal professionals in technology and what it could do for the legal sector and creating the ALT Network to kick-start that conversation on the continent. The ALT Network has grown to over 150 individual and business members over the past two years and has a thriving community and activities across the continent which I could not have predicted when we set up the platform! Engaging with the fast-growing African tech community has brought incredible insight into the legal and regulatory needs of tech disruptors across all sectors. I am delighted that the Network has quickly grown into a valued pan-African interlocutor in the discussion between lawyers, technologists, and regulators to build effective, responsive and progressive frameworks for tech growth in Africa.
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • My biggest challenge is also one that can be described as a ‘first world problem’ in that it is the challenge of opportunity and time – so many opportunities, not enough time! In the short couple of years, it has been around, ALT has attracted a significant following and interest from across the African legal and tech sectors. Law cuts across each and every area of personal, public and commercial life and as such, ALT and its membership have a role to play across the continent from influencing public policy to creating tools for delivering access to the law to all. Finding the time to explore and follow all the possibilities and requests alongside a full-time job does keep me up at night!
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • I have to say that the energy and enthusiasm of the ALT members is more motivation than anyone could ask for! Each day brings a new member. Each week brings a new idea and opportunity in a different country from an existing member so there’s never a quiet moment. But more than anything, the prospect of bringing together people and entities from across the continent who are all driven by the same thing – to create and build prosperity for all Africans through innovative tech use and creating an enabling legal environment for success. It has also been amazing to meet so many Africans working in different sectors and industries and to collaborate with some of them. Our recent partnership with Africa Digital Heritage, for example, to explore the legal issues arising in tech and the preservation of African cultural heritage was eye-opening and inspirational. I look forward to ALT continuing to be at the heart of similar collaborations and conversations over the years.

9. Odunoluwa Longe, Country Director, Acceleration (West Africa) at HiiL

  • Biggest Success in LegalTech
    • My greatest success is seeing the entrepreneurs succeed. Success here does not just entail in competitions but in the ecosystem as well.
  • What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology
    • My biggest challenge has been finding businesses that are solving justice problems and are focused on doing the same. A lot of people do not realize that justice is beyond just legal tech, It should be more focused on people gaining access to services that actually help them solve their problems.
  • What motivates you to keep going?
    • I am motivated by the need to help entrepreneurs and see them succeed.

Please join Techlawyered to celebrate these Wonder Women of Legal Tech.